Bombs dividing the US!

The culture wars that erupted between Republicans and Democrats with Donald Trump's election as U.S. president has almost divided Americans into two. The U.S. is going through the second big civil war in its history. The guns have not gone off yet, and states have not been divided, but nobody can guarantee that none of this will happen. Political scientists say the agreement regarding the protection of the "established order" between the mainstream parties is falling apart and politics is drifting toward extremes. While the Republican Party is being dragged toward a more populist and right-wing direction with Trump, a populist trend that is described as "Democratic Socialists" is showing signs of strengthening within the Democrat Party. In other words, the mainstream parties are disintegrating among themselves.

Conservative Catholic Brett Kavanaugh's vote to the U.S. Supreme Court escalated the severity of the culture wars. Kavanaugh and conservative Catholics secured the majority in the Supreme Court. The Supreme Court was long under the control of liberal members. This change in the Supreme Court will have political consequences.

The Zionist wing of Evangelical Christians gaining greater influence over the Trump administration is further politicizing the culture wars. The union of Catholic conservatism, white supremacism and Christian Zionism on the Trumpist platforms is described as a poisonous mixture. According to a recent poll by Pew Research Center, half of the Hispanic population in the U.S. - also the biggest minority group in the country - say their situation has exacerbated during Trump's term in office. As many as 62 percent of Hispanics from Latin America are unhappy about the state of the country. These rates make Hispanics' role in the November elections a valuable one.

The shift of politics toward populism has opened "democracy" to debate. Patrick J. Buchanan, a popular writer for The American Conservative magazine warned in his Oct. 26 article, saying, "Before we were a democracy, we were a republic. And we were always more than just a polity. We were a people and a nation. Today we seem to be two countries and two peoples."

Democrats and liberals advocate the view that Trump's discourses are leading ethnic, religious, political and cultural discrepancies toward conflict. Bombs being sent to more than 10 figures within the last week has boosted these discussions. The pro-Trump side described the mail bombs as a "liberal plot" against Republicans.

Some of the mail bombs were addressed to Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton, former Vice President Joe Biden and former Attorney General Eric Holder, actor Robert De Niro, billionaire businessman George Soros and former CIA head John Brennan. The packages prepared for Democrat Senator Cory Brooker and former International Intelligence Director James Clapper were intercepted before they reached their addresses. It should also be noted that Eric Holder, who was the attorney general during Obama's term in office was the first black American to take office in this position.

The perpetrator of the mail bombs turning out to be a pro-Trump fanatic showed that Democrats' fear is not so much in vain. Trump's Attorney General Jeff Sessions confessed that the culprit seems to be a "partisan." The fact that Cesar Sayoc, who has a lengthy criminal history, turned out to be a registered Republican put Trumpists in a difficult position. Sayoc, who posted pro-Trump messages on his social media accounts, is notorious for his conspiracy theories and hate speech against liberals. According to Trumpists, the "fake mail bombs" is a plot prepared to reverse the Republican wave that strengthened ahead of the midterm elections set to be held in November, and the anti-Trump mainstream media is also involved. Sayoc's arrest invalidated their conspiracy theories. In the meantime, there is a deep silence regarding Sayoc's motivation

+

We use cookies limited for the aims specified in the data policy and in accordance with the legislation. For details please see our data policy.