Israel is preventing Trump from meeting with Iran’s Rouhani! - ABDULLAH MURADOĞLU

Israel is preventing Trump from meeting with Iran’s Rouhani!

The man responsible for inviting Iranian foreign minister Javad Zarif to the G7 summit in Baaritz is none other than French President Emannuel Macron.

He did so to alleviate tensions between Tehran and Washington by inviting Zarif to one of the summit’s side meetings.

However, Macron’s attempts to bring Trump and Zarif together failed.

Among the G7 members are the U.S., U.K. and Germany which are signatories of the nuclear deal signed with Iran in 2015. Trump had withdrawn the U.S. from the deal that Obama signed.

The Israel Lobby and Saudi Arabia spared no effort to convince Trump, who won the 2016 presidential elections, to annul the deal.

Billionaire Zionist Sheldon Anderson, who is known for his friendship with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, made hefty donations to Trump’s election campaign to this end.

During his campaign, Trump pledged to withdraw the U.S. from the nuclear deal.

Albeit a little late, Trump made good on his promise in May 2018.

Despite the reports by the international Atomic Energy Agency and the U.S. Intelligence Community to the contrary, Trump accepted Israel’s claims that Iran had violated the nuclear deal.

Ever since then, we have been closely observing the ordeal between Washington and Tehran.

Trump stated that he would meet with Iranian President Hassan Rouhani without any pre-conditions.

This was Macron’s motivation for inviting Zarif to the G7 summit.

On the other hand, the possibility that Trump would meet with Zarif spooked Netanyahu to his core.

The Netanyahu wing appealed to Trump and Macron in order to stop the meeting from taking place.

Furthermore, Netanyahu appealed to U.S. Vice President Mike Pence and Secretary of State Mike Pompey for help.

Thus, the White House quelled Israel’s fears by releasing a statement saying that there wasn’t a meeting planned between Trump and Zarif.

The Israeli elections are going to be held on Sept.17. Hence, a Trump-Zarif meeting would be perceived as a weakness on Netanyahu’s part.

Trump, during his meeting with Egyptian President Sisi at theG7 summit, had said that he could disclose the political aspects of the so-called peace plan before Israel’s elections.

There’s a possibility that the undisclosed details of the plan might be detrimental to Netanyahu.

Could Trump make a move that would be harmful to Netanyahu?

Their fates are closely intertwined.

Trump’s Special Representative for International Negotiations Jason Greenblatt, who is among those running the Middle East Plan, declared in a tweet that the plan would be announced before the elections.

Trump had considered declaring the details of the plan’s political leg last April before the Israeli elections.

However, after a request from Netanyahu, Trump deferred releasing the details until after the elections.

Netanyahu, whose party was victorious in elections, called for snap elections on Sept.17 when he couldn’t form a government.

Trump saying that he could divulge the so-called peace plan before the elections in his meeting with Egypt’s Sisi, once again set Netanyahu on edge.

Netanyahu then made a statement saying that Trump had a good reason to disclose the Middle East Peace Plan a short while after the elections.

Greenblatt’s tweet had also somehow come immediately after this statement.

Someone had changed Trump’s mind once again.

Israel is worried that a meeting will take place between Trump and Rouhani during the UNGA in New York on Sept.17-27.

Rouhani states that he is open to meeting with Trump if the U.S. sanctions are lifted. Now, all eyes are on the UN summit. Israel, on the other hand, is searching for ways to hinder Trump meeting with Rouhani.

The question is: does Trump have the will and the power to meet Rouhani face to face in spite of Israel, or doesn’t he?

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