'Safe zone' condition for US visa

“Her Majesty's Prime Minister” Theresa May coming to Ankara directly after posing for a photograph with U.S. President Donald Trump with the bust of Winston Churchill between them – as you know, former U.S. President Barak Obama had thrown it out of the Oval Office – and on the way, advising the U.S. to establish dialogue with Russia, adding that they should be careful, saying, “engage but beware”…

Trump signing the memorandum in relation to the restructuring of the national security council…

Russian President Vladimir Putin's statement on the same day that Russia's military forces need to seriously strengthen combat potential...

Mikhail Gorbachev's statement, “It looks as if the world is preparing for war”…

The Chinese Foreign Ministry's quick refutation of the claim that “Beijing is deploying intercontinental ballistic missiles on the Russian border,” whose origin is also strangely obscure…

Well-known Russian producer Karen Shakhnazarov saying that Turkey would not attack Russia, even if instructed to do so by NATO – and his connection to the matter being the object of interest…

The fuss to stifle the request for the extradition of Fetullah Terrorist Organization (FETÖ)-affiliated traitors, who have requested political asylum from Athens and NATO, before it could even get through Europe's door, so that they do not “serve as an example”…

Main opposition Republican People's Party's (CHP) shameful statement directed at Turkey's top brass who paid a visit to the Kardak region, the pair of two small uninhabited islets in the Aegean Sea, known as Imia in Greek…

Finally, German Chancellor Angela Merkel's Turkey visit, important enough for Ankara to slip the words, “We are preparing well, we hope to see”…

Of course all this means something, they are connected. However, they are not enough for us to work on a new big picture, neither individually nor collectively.

American dream visa is made of icing sugar

President Trump doing justice to the “Let's wait until Jan. 20 and see what happens” expectations. We are watching the repercussions of the travel ban he imposed Friday on immigrants and seven Muslim-majority countries – Iraq, Syria, Iran, Sudan, Yemen, Libya and Somalia…

Immediately after the announcement of this executive order, the prime minister of U.S.'s northern neighbor, Canada, opposed the order saying, “Canadians will welcome you.”

As a result, the Islamic Culture Center in Quebec, which is also used as a mosque, was attacked by terrorists during prayer time in the evening, leaving six people dead.

These are also connected, but they too are insufficient to explain the whole…

Because there is a “background” to these bans…

Besides the bans there are also the Green Card and visa applications regarding which the president said, “We will impose strict rules.”

Getting a U.S. visa had never been easy. But now, we are in its “strict” state. We need to answer who this is addressing rather than what it means. Because the list of those “banned” is known, but this is hidden.

It is explicitly said that the enforcement is going to make it quite difficult for the citizens of Saudi Arabia and Pakistan and as a matter of fact, “a certain social segment of these countries” to obtain a visa to the U.S. (“Extreme Vetting,” 28/01, The Nation.)

This is going to be disturbing for Riyadh and Islamabad. Pakistan's harsh reaction is already known. The sister country's media outlets are advising the government to avoid wasting time seeking to form consensus with the Trump administration.

There are two questions this point onward.

What will Turkey say?

Saudi Arabia, Pakistan and some Gulf countries are regions with which Turkey has close relations – both economic and political. Turkey is not mentioned in relation to this matter, but what kind of reaction will Ankara show regarding this situation.

How will European countries evaluate this move by Trump, will they follow in his footsteps? What impact will it have on the existing anti-Islam policy-psychology in the West?

This is a question related to the worth of European values.

They will not want to deal with the sizable partnerships Western countries have with the said countries/regions, let alone give the image of a “civilized world.” Besides, it should be known that Trump personally has business relations in the countries which have been banned by the U.S. ('Tracking Trump's Web of Conflicts', 01/01, Bloomberg.)

Eventually, the matter of interest is, what part of the new White House's Middle East policies does this imposition/discrimination, which sees Muslim-majority countries as outcasts, form?

We also need to describe the relations of the long-time missing-in-action Israel and its lobby in the U.S. with the new administration. Because this description will direct Turkey-Israel ties.

The shadow of the bans and toughening of visa policies in Syria needs to be seen as well.

We are following Washington and Trump's statements regarding safe zones with interest as we have legitimate sensitivities, but some texts need to be read over again.

“We are going to establish safe zones in Syria. All that is happening in Syria are so upsetting. We also need to help people. There are the Gulf States. All they have is money. We don't. We have a $20-trillion debt. I am going to ensure that the Gulf States give us lots of money and this way we are going to help the set up safe zones in Syria…”

Trump is confident that he will squeeze money out of Saudi Arabian King Salman bin Abdulaziz to help the Syrian refugees. And he thinks he is going to do this by making Riyadh princes and princesses wait in visa queues – or by rejecting them?

“We are going to review in extreme detail. I mean really extreme. We are not going to accept anybody who we think may cause even the slightest problem. Our reviews are going to be extreme. It is going to be very difficult to enter. It is going to become very very difficult…”



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